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The Proper Way to Show a Home to a Buyer

Dewayne:

Do you know what’s important when you’re showing a property? Welcome back to another episode of our series, 60 lessons that we’ve learned in 60 years. Today, we’re going to discuss the lessons that we’ve learned in showing property, or when you’re showing property to a buyer.

Kirk:

So listen to the client so you can learn what’s important and you can shorten their search. That’s one of the criteria.

Dewayne:

We see it all the time where agents are showing 13 properties to one buyer. Well, that tells me that they didn’t listen. There’s not 13 properties that can fit someone’s criteria if you actually listened to them and knew the market. So as an agent, you need to shorten the search. That’s part of your job. And the other part is take yourself as the agent out of it. You’re not buying this house. The same objections that are objections to you, might not be objections to the buyer.

Kirk:

So in other words, don’t point out the objections. That’s really important.

Dewayne:

Listen, understand-

Kirk:

State the facts.

Dewayne:

State the facts, absolutely state the facts. But where the laundry room is in relation to the rest of the house, if that’s a problem for you as an agent, you’re not putting that on your buyer because they haven’t said anything. But we see it so many times where agents just give their unsolicited opinion and all they’re doing is just pointing out objections for themselves and not necessarily listening to what the client’s feedback is.

Kirk:

So a salient fact might be someone that says, “Hey, I’m buying this piece of property.” Downtown Melbourne, for example, and there’s a potential, “They’ll build an 85 story condominium – or 85 five foot, not story, 85 foot condominium in front of me – and will block the view.” That’s a salient fact. That’s something you want to-

Dewayne:

That’s a stat.

Kirk:

That’s something you want to share.

Dewayne:

That’s your job.

Kirk:

That’s your job. Yeah.

Dewayne:

Right. To protect them and bring value to them in that point, but it might not bring value to them, stating things that are objections to you like, “Oh, this house is too close to the road,” or whatever, especially if the client didn’t bring that up.

Kirk:

It’s an opinion.

Dewayne:

It’s an opinion. Exactly. Say, in your unsolicited opinion.

Kirk:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Dewayne:

So this is a very exciting journey and portion for the clients potentially. Stressful for some. But you’re the expert, guide them. Don’t try to add extra monkey wrenches that they’ve not brought up with your unsolicited opinion.

Kirk:

Back to the 80%. If it meets 80% of the criteria of what somebody wants, make it work.

Dewayne:

Because there’s always going to be trade-offs.

Kirk:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Absolutely. Hey, thank you so much for joining us. You can always comment and you can send us questions. We really enjoy the questions. Join us next week when we learn the benefits of owning versus renting. We’ll see you next week.

Dewayne:

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